Reflecting on World Suicide Prevention Day

World Suicide Prevention Day is Saturday, September 10. Each September, the globe gathers to raise awareness on suicide prevention and honor those who were taken too soon by suicide.

Sponsored by the International Association for Suicide Prevention (IASP) and endorsed by the World Health Organization (WHO), this initiative aims to build an effective forum with collaboration among global partners and promoting evidence-based action to reduce suicide rates.

The tragic effects of suicide impact everyone around the world – no matter where you live. Here are some key statistics showing the global magnitude of suicide:

  1. Each year, more than 700,000 lives are lost around the world due to suicide.
  2. Over one in every 100 deaths were caused by suicide.
  3. Suicide is the fourth-leading cause of death globally among individuals ages 15-29.
  4. The global suicide rate is twice as high among men than women.
  5. The U.S. ranks 23rd among countries with the highest suicide rates.
  6. A previous suicide attempt is the biggest risk factor for suicide deaths.

Many citizens of the world experience adverse situations such as violence, abuse, loss, disaster, discrimination, isolation and more. These difficult and trying situations can increase instances of behavioral health disorders and in turn, are associated with suicidal behaviors.

Over the past few decades, the state of mental health across the globe has hit a significant point in history. The number of suicide deaths have risen by 20,000 over the past 30 years around the world.

With each nation suffering from rates of suicide, many countries are advocating for improved access to critical mental healthcare. The U.S. took a significant stride in preventing suicide in July 2022 by launching 988, the easy-to-dial three-digit number for the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. With the rollout of the new number, the U.S. started on a path to streamline critical care for those in crisis and decrease instances of suicide.

Although we must raise awareness all year long to make a change, World Suicide Prevention Day is a chance for everyone around the world to come together to save lives. This year, the theme for World Suicide Prevention Day is “Creating Hope Through Action”.

“By encouraging understanding, reaching in, and sharing experiences, we want to give people the confidence to take action. To prevent suicide requires us to become a beacon of light to those in pain. You can be the light.”

The IASP encourages all to be compassionate, supporting, and understanding to individuals who have experienced the pain of suicidal thoughts and losing a loved one to suicide. By coming together to listen and share, we can all make a difference and spark change.

If someone you love is experiencing thoughts of suicide, your support could truly save their life. Follow these five action steps to communicate with someone who may be suicidal to help them get the care they need and prevent suicide:

  1. Ask – Be transparent and ask your loved one if they have thoughts of suicide. Have a direct dialogue can help your loved one open about their emotional pain. Carefully listen to their answers and ask thoughtful follow-up questions.
  2. Be there – Calling or physically being with your loved one can greatly show your support. Following through with promises of being there for your loved one can improve your connection with them and prevent them from feeling isolated.
  3. Keep them safe –As difficult as it is to ask questions about your loved one’s suicidal thoughts, it can help keep them as safe as possible. Create a proactive plan to reduce access to lethal means to ensure they are out of immediate danger. Always call 911 if there is an imminent threat to their well-being.
  4. Help them connect – Establishing a safety plan and finding crisis care for a suicidal person is critical. Connect your loved one with resources such as the 988 Lifeline or other mental health professionals to help them get the support they need.
  5. Follow up – After you have the initial conversation and create an immediate safety plan, follow up with your loved one to see if they are well. A phone call, text, letter, or in-person visit with your loved one will remind them they are loved and cared for.

If you are experiencing suicidal thoughts, call or text 988 to get connected to crisis care immediately. You do not have to fight this alone.

By giving vital support to those who need it, we can truly make a change and prevent suicide worldwide. During this World Suicide Prevention Day, you can do your part by destigmatizing mental health issues and raising awareness for suicide prevention. With your help, the world could save millions of lives.

If you or a loved one are seeking mental health or substance use disorder treatment, we can help. Use our free Treatment Connection assessment tool to find state-vetted behavioral health treatment in your area.

DISCLAIMER: THIS BLOG POST DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE

The information, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images, and other material (collectively, “Information”) contained on this blog post are for informational purposes only. None of the Information is intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment and before undertaking a new health care regimen, and never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this blog post.

How Exercise Impacts Your Mental Health

We have all heard time and time again how important it is for us to exercise. We all know that exercising has countless benefits for our physical health such as losing weight, lowering risk of infection, improving circulation, and many more.

While exercising can greatly support our physical well-being, it can also support our mental health. In recent years, the state of behavioral health in the U.S. has hit an all-time low. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found about 1 in 6 adults will experience depression at some time in their lives, affecting 16 million American adults every year.

As we work to destigmatize mental health and improve access to behavioral health care, researchers are studying the brain and factors that may contribute to depression. Neuroscientists have discovered that the hippocampus of the brain, the area that regulates mood and emotion, is generally smaller in individuals with depression.

Exercise has been found to have a profound effect on our mental health, and even supports nerve cell growth in this area of the brain to relieve symptoms of depression.

In addition, when you exercise, your body releases endorphins, which are chemicals that are released when the body experiences pain or stress. As endorphins are released, they can ease feelings of depression and improve your overall mood. Many equate the release of endorphins to taking a dose of morphine and it is often referred to as a “runner’s high.”

You don’t have to run a marathon to feel the release of endorphins and reduce levels of stress, though. A recent meta-analysis looking at 15 studies with 190,000 participants found adults who did 1.25 hours of brisk walking each week had an 18% lower chance of experiencing depression compared to individuals who did not exercise. Increasing the activity to an equivalent of 2.5 hours of brisk walking per week resulted in a 25% lower chance of experiencing depression.

Physical activity can also help improve your self-esteem. Achieving milestones while exercising can give you a major confidence boost and lift your spirits. For example, you may feel stronger and more powerful after you finished a difficult hike, dance class, or long walk. Hitting these milestones and feeling proud of your accomplishments can have a profound impact on your mental health.

Individuals with depression and anxiety can also have some trouble getting enough sleep – about 75% of individuals with depression have trouble falling or staying asleep. Lack of sleep can impact your productivity throughout the day and can even worsen your mood.

Thankfully, exercising can help with that. Physical activity can help regulate your circadian rhythm, which helps our body recognize tiredness and alertness. This can help your body establish a routine to get enough sleep at night and improve your energy levels and overall mood.

There are plenty of physical activities you can work into your daily life to get your body moving and help ease feelings of stress, depression, and/or anxiety. Some types of exercise you can add to your routine include:

  • Hiking
  • Dancing
  • Biking
  • Swimming
  • Weightlifting
  • Yoga or Pilates
  • Walking your dog

You should always enjoy the type of exercise you are doing. Try a couple of different types of physical activity to see which you enjoy the most. Having fun is important – and an easy way to put a smile on your face.

It is important to note that exercise is not recommended as a cure for depression and anxiety. Experts suggest integrating physical activity into your daily routine to support your existing treatment plan.

“For some people it works as well as antidepressants, although exercise alone isn’t enough for someone with severe depression,”

Dr. Michael Craig Miller, assistant professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School

Always consult with your doctor or care team when determining the best course of action to treat your anxiety or depression. Exercise can be a great outlet for you to relieve stress and build self-confidence to help you live a long, happy, healthy life.

Visit Treatment Connection to find a state-vetted mental health or substance use disorder treatment provider near you.

DISCLAIMER: THIS BLOG POST DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE
The information, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images, and other material (collectively, “Information”) contained on this blog post are for informational purposes only. None of the Information is intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment and before undertaking a new health care regimen, and never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this blog post.

How to Identify and Deal with the Main Stressors in Your Life

In this day and age, we all lead incredibly busy lives. Trying to balance your job, family, friends, pets, home, health, hobbies, and other responsibilities can become overwhelming.

As if life wasn’t already stressful enough, the COVID-19 pandemic brought on even more mental health challenges due to social isolation and changes in routine. According to the 2021 Global Emotions Report, the world was more stressed-out than it was any time in the past 15 years.

The 2020 Stress in America™ Report from the American Psychological Association (APA) found nearly 78% adults said the COVID-19 pandemic was a significant source of stress in their lives, and 67% of adults said they experienced increased stress levels during the pandemic.

The report also found a variety of societal issues caused a large percentage of Americans a significant amount of stress:

The future of the U.S. – 77%
Health care – 66%
Mass shootings – 62%
Climate change/global warming – 55%
Suicide rates – 51%
Immigration – 47%
Widespread sexual harassment/assault reports in the news – 47%
Opioid/heroin epidemic – 45%

Personal issues that an individual deals with every day can also add a great deal of stress to life. About 90% of Americans are stressed about their finances, and about 80% stress over their jobs.

Stress can have a great impact on not only your mental health, but your physical health as well. When you’re feeling especially stressed, you may notice you feel fatigued, or even snap at those around you without meaning to. An accumulation of stress can take a major toll on your mind and body.

Mental and physical signs of stress include:

Anxiety
Irritability
Depression
Panic attacks
Mood swings
Trouble sleeping
Headaches
Dizziness
High blood pressure
Chest pain or high heart rate
Tense muscles
Digestive problems

These symptoms are not ideal and can impede your daily responsibilities and overall happiness. In some situations, stress can also lead to substance use, eating disorders, smoking, gambling, and other issues.

Some days it may seem impossible to eliminate what is making you stressed and to find a way to relax. Thankfully, there are strategies you can adopt to reframe what is making you feel stressed.

The first step in alleviating stressors in your life is to identify them. Becoming more mindful to what triggers your stress can help you find the root of the problem. Do you get anxious when thinking about your finances? Is your job so demanding that you’re losing sleep and feel irritable? If so, they may be the main stressors in your life.

According to the University of Minnesota, one of the best ways to deal with stressors is to adjust your attitude. When dealing with stress, we can become very negative, which can be detrimental to effectively dealing with stressful situations. By reframing your mindset and viewing stressors as challenges and not threats, you can cope with stress in a more effective way.

“You can’t get rid of [unhealthy] stress altogether, that would be great if you could, but you can learn to manage it effectively,”
Angela Ficken, psychotherapist

Follow these steps to adjust your attitude when dealing with stressful situations:

When you feel stressed, remind yourself you have the resources to tackle this situation’s challenge.
Conversely, accept that there are some things you can’t change – don’t stress about things you can’t control.
Avoid being angry or combative and voice your assertive beliefs, opinions, and/or feelings.
When tackling a large task, divide responsibilities into smaller tasks to avoid becoming overwhelmed.
Create your schedule wisely and allow time for interruptions or change.
Research ways to eliminate stress such as therapy, yoga, walking, or writing in a journal.

Resetting how you view stressful situations can help you deal with them in a more effective way, helping you feel more at-ease when problem solving. Over time, identifying your stressors and mindfully reframing or eliminating them can have a better impact on your mental and physical well-being.

If you are searching for mental health or substance use disorder treatment, we can help. Visit Treatment Connection to find a treatment provider in your area.

DISCLAIMER: THIS BLOG POST DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE
The information, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images, and other material (collectively, “Information”) contained on this blog post are for informational purposes only. None of the Information is intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment and before undertaking a new health care regimen, and never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this blog post.

National LGBTQ+ Health Awareness Week

Those who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer or questioning (LGBTQ+) often face social stigma, discrimination, and other challenges. These factors increase their risk for various substance use and mental health issues.

What Is National LGBTQ+ Health Awareness Week?

The goal of National LGBT Health Awareness Week is to raise awareness of routine and specialized care for people in the LGBTQ+ community. People who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer or questioning are at risk for not getting the level of care they need because of a fear of seeking out help or, more commonly, due to discrimination. National LGBT Health Awareness Week brings attention to the tragic cycle of discrimination and health inequities that affect LBGTQ+ people.

What Types of Concerns Exist for LGBTQ+ Health Awareness?

There are many ways in which limited access to care impacts this community. Here are some examples:

  • Employment discrimination that limits access to jobs that provide health insurance.
  • Unable to receive health insurance coverage from their partner due to harmful company policies.
  • Increasingly high costs make many unable to afford vital preventative health care.
  • Many of these individuals face social stigma and discrimination and, as a result, may not feel comfortable discussing their specific health needs.
  • Disparities in the level of care received.

What Has to Change When It Comes to LGBTQ+ Health Disparities?

LGBT health awareness week provides resources to those looking to get involved and enact change in their communities. Below are some simple ways you can help in this effort of improving LGBTQ+ health:

  • Encourage employers to recognize those within the community as viable partners in relationships who deserve the same type of health coverage given to others.
  • Encourage state lawmakers to pass laws that encourage improved access to healthcare as well as affordable health insurance.
  • Work to ensure your own practice, if you are a doctor or other medical provider, never discriminates against people who have different lifestyles or physical needs than others – eliminate all LGBTQ+ discrimination in your practice.
  • Seek out care. Never be hesitant to find the support you need and want. Mental health is just as important as physical health. So, it is critical to take time to think about your needs and get any support necessary.
  • Help someone who is LGBTQ+ struggling with their health to get the care they need. A donation, a trip to a doctor’s appointment, or just a bit of support can go a long way.
  • If you know someone in the LGBTQ+ community is struggling with addiction and ready to get help, begin the journey to recovery by using the addiction treatment needs assessment tool.

Do you or someone you know need help finding addiction treatment in your area? The Treatment Connection website can help those in need find affirming care providers. There are many organizations, hospitals, medical providers, and treatment centers working hard to do their part to provide better access to standardized care for everyone.

DISCLAIMER: THIS BLOG POST DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE
The information, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images, and other material (collectively, “Information”) contained on this blog post are for informational purposes only. None of the Information is intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment and before undertaking a new health care regimen, and never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this blog post.

Shining a Light on Mental Health Awareness Month

During the month of May, we recognize Mental Health Awareness Month. Since 1949, this awareness initiative aims to provide support for individuals with mental illness and to educate the public on the importance of behavioral health.

According to the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), nearly 1 in 5 adults in the U.S. are living with mental illness. About half of the estimated 52.9 million individuals living with mental health conditions also suffer from substance use disorders of drugs and alcohol. This epidemic hit an all-time high last year as the number of drug overdose-related deaths was over 105,000, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Unfortunately, many people may feel uncomfortable seeking help due to the stigma surrounding behavioral health issues. By coming together to destigmatize mental illness and showing support for those living with behavioral health issues, we can help millions of people get the treatment they deserve.

Some initiatives aiming to ease the behavioral health crisis include increased research for substance use prevention, better access to treatment, and improved crisis care. The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) supports research to find ways to prevent substance use. As awareness for mental health increases, the availability of treatment options expands. And the new National Suicide Prevention Lifeline phone number, 988, will roll out in July 2022 to connect individuals in emergency situations with life-saving mental health care.

These are only a handful of large initiatives to make mental health treatment more accessible. We, as individuals, can make a great impact on this movement by helping our own loved ones get the behavioral health treatment they need.

Some ways we can support and advocate for our family and friends struggling with their mental health include:

  • Express your concern in a gentle manner. Talking about mental health can be emotional. Don’t make any judgements to keep your loved one comfortable during a sensitive conversation.
  • Be a good listener. Ask your loved one questions and listen carefully when they tell their story.
  • Tell them you care about them. Letting your loved ones know you care about them, and their healing, can go a long way.
  • Ask if you can find help. Many people may feel uncomfortable in taking the first step to find treatment. Having a friend can be very helpful during this process.
  • Be aware of triggers. Individuals with behavioral health issues such as substance use disorders or anxiety may have certain triggers that impact their actions and emotions deeply. Being mindful of these triggers can support them during treatment.
  • Watch for behavioral changes. If your loved one is exhibiting signs of anxiety, depression, anger, lethargy, or social isolation, check up on them to see if they need help.
  • Check in on them during recovery. Behavioral health treatment can take time, so it’s important to let your loved one know they have your support throughout the entire journey.

In addition to supporting those close to you, you can also participate in Mental Health Awareness Month activities with the online community. Rallying together to tell our own stories and advocate for change can make a huge impact on society.

You can share your support for Mental Health Awareness Month by:

  • Sharing your personal story online with #Together4MH
  • Volunteering for advocacy events in your community
  • Attending virtual webinars through the National Alliance on Mental Health (NAMI)
  • Advocating for mental health policy change with #Vote4MentalHealth

Mental Health Awareness Month is a time for us to reflect on the behavioral health crisis. By working together, we can do our part in improving access to treatment and destigmatizing mental illness.

Remember: you are not alone in this fight. It is never too late to get help. If you or a loved one is ready to seek behavioral health treatment, use the free Treatment Connection assessment tool to find treatment options near you.

Do I Need Mental Health Treatment?

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), nearly one in four individuals worldwide has a mental health condition. Unfortunately, many people who are battling this condition do not seek treatment. Because of the stigma surrounding mental health conditions and treatment options, many people choose to suffer in silence, even though their condition is treatable. However, many people use substances, such as drugs and alcohol, to help balance out their mental health condition. Unfortunately, this can lead to worsening mental illness. 

For help finding a mental health treatment professional in your area, visit Treatment Connection today. 

Do I Need Mental Health Treatment?

There are many types of mental health conditions, including:

  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • PTSD
  • Bipolar disorder
  • Schizophrenia

It is possible to live a healthy and happy life despite mental health conditions. However, it is vital to seek treatment at a professional treatment center for this to be possible. Are you asking, “Do I need mental health treatment?” Talk to a doctor or mental health treatment professional about your concerns. Here are five signs that indicate you should seek mental health treatment.

Excessive Anxiety

Everyone experiences worry and anxiety from time to time. You may get nervous before giving that big presentation for your boss or when you’re about to go on a first date. However, if you’re dealing with excessive anxiety and stress that simply won’t go away, you may be dealing with an anxiety disorder. If you’ve tried a range of treatment strategies to combat your condition but haven’t been able to find relief, it’s time to seek mental health treatment. 

Experiencing Crippling Trauma

When a person is involved with a traumatic event, their brain unleashes specific hormones, which raise their heart rate, adrenaline, and blood sugar. This state of being is often called the “fight or flight” instinct. Repeated or prolonged trauma may cause a person’s brain to remain in that state, playing it repeatedly in your mind. If this is the case for you, you may be experiencing post-traumatic stress disorder. However, with the help of therapy and effective coping mechanisms, you can go back to “normal” life. 

Withdrawing From Friends and Family

Most people know that introverts need a certain amount of time to rest and recharge after being around other people. However, after that moment of seclusion, they can engage in your life again. If your alone time leads to extensive withdrawal and disinterest in activities that you formerly consider hobbies, you may be battling depression, bipolar disorder, or another mental health condition.

Notable Changes in Appetite or Sleep Patterns

When you move or change jobs, a change in your eating or sleeping habits is to be expected. However, as you adjust to these life changes, you generally return to your normal patterns. If the changes come out of nowhere or seem to last for a period of longer than two weeks, you may actually be dealing with a mental health condition. If you’re sleeping too much or dealing with insomnia, you may be battling depression or anxiety. Not wanting to eat at all or wanting to eat a great deal might also be a symptom of depression. Mental health treatment can assist you in restoring your normal habits. 

Using Drugs or Alcohol

Many people who battle mental health conditions use drugs and alcohol as a way to help them cope with their symptoms. For instance, if you’re struggling with bipolar disorder, you might use depressants such as alcohol to get yourself through a manic phase. However, using substances can lead to further mental health conditions or exacerbate the symptoms. With the help of dual diagnosis treatment, you can address both conditions simultaneously. 

Get Mental Health Treatment Today

If you’re still asking, “Do I need mental health treatment?” Treatment Connection can help. Using our site, you can anonymously search for treatment providers around you. We can help you determine what type of treatment is most likely to fit your needs and you can submit confidential inquiries to mental health treatment providers. For more information about mental health treatment options, visit Treatment Connection today. 

DISCLAIMER: THIS BLOG POST DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE
The information, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images, and other material (collectively, “Information”) contained on this blog post are for informational purposes only. None of the Information is intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment and before undertaking a new health care regimen, and never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this blog post.

Holistic Mental Health Treatment Methods

Rather than mental health treatment, as usual, many treatment facilities have taken on a new approach to mental health treatment utilizing effective, evidence-based holistic mental health treatment options instead.

Holistic medicine is a form of healing that considers the whole person — body, mind, spirit, and emotions. It considers all mental and social factors rather than just the present symptoms of mental health disorder. It attempts to address the root cause of mental health struggles and heal the entire body.

As an effective solution to help people on their recovery journey, many treatment centers now offer holistic mental health treatment programs and services. Treatment Connection, an online resource for those who suffer from mental health disorders and their families, can connect you or a loved one with the facility to best suit your needs. Use the online portal to find a treatment program near you.

Holistic Treatment Methods

Taking a holistic approach to mental health treatment simply means that treatment options encompass an overall well-being methodology. While talk therapy and medications may be necessary in some cases and for some levels of mental illness, some people may respond very well to alternative methods of treatment in their treatment plan.

Some effective, evidence-based holistic treatment options include:

Recreational Therapy

The goal of recreation therapy is to reduce mental health issues by lowering stress and anxiety through relaxation, recovering basic motor functioning through physical activity, enhancing reasoning abilities, building confidence, and improving communication. Recreational activities may include:

  • Arts and crafts
  • Animals
  • Sports
  • Games and puzzles
  • Dance and movement
  • Drama and comedy
  • Community outings

Equine Therapy

Sometimes referred to as horse-assisted therapy, equine therapy is a form of treatment where individuals work through their issues by developing a relationship with horses. Clients work with horses to develop and promote self-esteem, address fear and anxiety stemming from trauma, and practice empathy. Through equine therapy, many of those with substance use and mental health disorders may also learn to become more mindful and develop and practice patience.

In equine therapy, individuals build up a more active and positive sense of self as they do work with the animals. It is a means to feel actively useful and needed increasing one’s sense of responsibility and acceptance. One of the reasons this form of therapy is so effective, fostering higher rehab retention and completion rates, is how it diverges from the usual therapeutic approaches. In equine therapy, individuals aren’t receiving direct treatment for their substance use disorder but rather a kind of adjunct therapy allowing them to commit more effectively to other concurrent treatments.

Art Therapy

Self-expression in any form is proven to be an effective treatment method as measured by the SERATS scale. This tool helps validate that “making art in a healthy way serves as positive emotion regulation and self-development” and is beneficial to mental health recovery. Common medium for self-expression may include:

  • Drawing
  • Painting
  • Sculpting
  • Collage
  • Photography
  • Music Therapy

Music has a soothing, relaxing effect on many people, and it is no different in music therapy. Trained musicians encourage clients to express their feelings and emotions creatively through singing, listening, and moving to music.

Yoga Therapy

A yoga therapy program is designed to heal and strengthen the body, mind, and spirit. Yoga poses can be easy to do and can improve your overall well-being as well as other physical and mental benefits such as:

  • Increased flexibility, muscle strength, and tone
  • Improved breathing, energy, and vitality
  • Weight reduction
  • Improved cardiovascular health
  • Improved mental calmness

Benefits of Holistic Mental Health Treatment

The mind has a potent effect on the body. Therefore it is logical that if the mind is happy, the body will follow suit. There are many benefits of holistic mental health treatment, each revolving around developing and nurturing the mind-body connection to ensure life-long success in recovery.

The tools and skills learned in holistic treatment can be used in all areas of a person’s life to help them handle the many stresses, conflicts, and triggers that will inevitably threaten their mental health. Physically, holistic therapies help to relieve stress, relax tight muscles, and improve the immune system. The mental benefits of holistic therapy reach far and wide, touching all aspects of a person’s wellbeing, including creating an improved sense of self, increasing mental clarity, and reducing stress and anxiety.

Even for those who do not suffer from mental health issues, the benefits of holistic therapy methods have proven to be a tremendously effective and easy way to maintain health and well-being.

Treatment Connection: The Source for Holistic Treatment Options

Treatment Connection, an online resource for mental health treatment programs, connects those searching for therapy options with facilities and caregivers that can help. Use the online portal to learn more about the many centers near you to provide you with the mental health treatment options you or a loved one need and deserve.

DISCLAIMER: THIS BLOG POST DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE
The information, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images, and other material (collectively, “Information”) contained on this blog post are for informational purposes only. None of the Information is intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment and before undertaking a new health care regimen, and never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this blog post.